Addiction Sameness

Alcohol, Opiates, Fat and Sugar are all Addictive Substances: this blog is about that "addiction sameness".

Monday, May 16, 2016

Fathers drinking: Also responsible for fetal disorders?


This puts a new spin on responsibility...

Fathers drinking: Also responsible for fetal disorders?

Date:
February 14, 2014
Source:
Taylor & Francis
Summary:
Maternal exposure to alcohol in-utero is a known risk and cause of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). FAS children suffer significant problems such as retarded intellect, stunted growth and nervous system abnormalities, social problems and isolation. Until now, fathers have not had a causal link to such disabilities. Ground breaking new research has been revealed which shows dads may have more accountability.
 
 
FULL STORY

The authors believe alcohol consumption affects genes in sperm which are responsible for normal fetal development.
Credit: © Dario Lo Presti / Fotolia
 
 
Maternal exposure to alcohol in-utero is a known risk and cause of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. FAS children suffer significant problems such as retarded intellect, stunted growth and nervous system abnormalities, social problems and isolation. Until now Fathers have not had a causal link to such disabilities. Ground breaking new research has been revealed which shows Dads may have more accountability.

Published in Animal Cells and Systems, researchers studied male mice exposed to varying concentrations of alcohol and one control group exposed only to saline. After exposure the mice were mated and resulting fetuses examined. The findings revealed previously unknown and riveting evidence that paternal alcohol consumption can directly affect fetal development.

A number of fetuses sired by males exposed to alcohol suffered abnormal organ development and or brain development. Those in the saline group were normal. So, can developmental abnormalities be predetermined at fertilization? This research proves so. The authors believe alcohol consumption affects genes in sperm which are responsible for normal fetal development.

Until now fathers' lifestyle choices have not seen any repercussion on their unborn children. This ground-breaking research provides the first definitive evidence that fathers' drinking habits pre-conception can cause significant fetal abnormalities.


Story Source:
The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Taylor & Francis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference:
  1. Hye Jeong Lee, Jae-Sung Ryu, Na Young Choi, Yo Seph Park, Yong Il Kim, Dong Wook Han, Kisung Ko, Chan Young Shin, Han Sung Hwang, Kyung-Sun Kang, Kinarm Ko. Transgenerational effects of paternal alcohol exposure in mouse offspring. Animal Cells and Systems, 2013; 17 (6): 429 DOI: 10.1080/19768354.2013.865675

Cite This Page:
Taylor & Francis. "Fathers drinking: Also responsible for fetal disorders?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 February 2014. .






Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140214075405.htm



Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Visceral Fat


   Tuomas Marttila via Getty Images

 

Why The Fat You Can See Isn’t The Fat You Should Worry About

All body fat is not created equal.

 

In reality, the area of your body where you store your fat may be a better predictor of health -- regardless of your body mass index.
"All fat is not the same," said Dr. Virend Somers, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Fat directly under the skin -- the stuff we can see -- isn't necessarily harmful.
It's the invisible fat that we need to be concerned about.
"The fat inside is the one that we’re realizing is harmful," Somer said. "It’s much more metabolically active and produces all kinds of bad things. It’s the kind of fat that’s linked to high cardiovascular risk."

The difference between visible and invisible fat

While obesity is linked to myriad health problems, including coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke and Type 2 diabetes, all fat is not created equal.
Subcutaneous fat is the visible kind that we're used to seeing, the stuff that you can pinch on your stomach or thighs. This type of fat lives under the skin, and is relatively safe, health-wise. Pear-shaped people, who have smaller waists and store weight in their hips, also tend to have more subcutaneous fat.
Apple-shaped people, who store weight around their mid-sections, tend to have more visceral fat. Visceral fat is internal, and you can't usually tell if someone has it just by looking. Visceral fat collects around organs such as the stomach, intestine, spleen and kidneys.
"You don’t see this fat early on," Somers explained. If you're lean and you start putting on weight, without seeing any visible outward changes, that could be visceral fat. "Then suddenly it starts bulging out and that’s when the belly starts hanging out," he said.

But all is not lost if you're 'apple' shaped


 
  via Getty Images

Luckily for those who carry their pounds around their mid-sections, losing just a small amount of weight -- even just 10 pounds -- can make a huge difference in health outcomes, and can lower your risk for Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
A small 2010 study compared two groups of young, healthy-weight participants. One group maintained their weight over eight weeks, but researchers overfed the second group, causing them to gain about 10 pounds each on average. The health results, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, were striking.
Among the fat-gain group, some participants gained more visceral fat and some gained more subcutaneous fat. Those who gained the most visceral fat, about a third of participants, saw the biggest deterioration in blood pressure and in endothelial function, a measure of how well the blood vessels are working. At the end of the 16 weeks of the study, when the visceral fat-gainers had lost the excess weight, their endothelial function returned to normal.
Those who gained mostly subcutaneous fat didn't see any significant change in endothelial function.
"They didn’t look that different," Somers, one of authors of the study, said of the participants' modest weight gain. "It’s not merely a function of getting fat. It’s where the fat goes."

How do I know if I have visceral fat?

Unfortunately, the body-fat scale at your gym, which uses a method called bioelectrical impedance analysis, isn't especially accurate. The gold standards for visceral fat analysis include MRIs, CT scans and hydrostatic water weighing, which don't come cheap. If you're not interested in investing in a pricey test or two, a good rough proxy is to calculate your waist-to-hip ratio. For men, the ratio should be no higher than 0.90, for women, no higher than 0.83.
Don't despair if the resulting number isn't what you'd hoped -- it's easy enough to start addressing the problem, because "Exercise disproportionately targets visceral fat,” Gary R. Hunter, a professor of human studies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, told the New York Times in 2015.
Hunter's research bears this out. A 2010 study published in the journal Obesity found that sedentary women who started a twice-weekly, 40-minute exercise regimen lost 10 percent of their visceral fat during the year that they were enrolled in the study.


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"Ask Healthy Living" is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice. Please consult a qualified health care professional for personalized medical advice.

Link: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1rmpD7/:1sOFtIzmC:AqJ3R6br/www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/difference-between-visceral-and-subcutaneous-fat_us_56d48b65e4b0bf0dab32e46f



Pornography

‘You cannot accept any pornography in your man’s life’: Terry Crews reveals his fight with porn addiction
 
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In a series of video confessions that could one day become educational tools, former NFL player and Brooklyn Nine-Nine star Terry Crews has taken it upon himself to reveal his “dirty little secret” — a porn addiction.
Crews actually first revealed his addiction two years ago in his memoir, titled Manhood. And in an interview with Wendy Williams to promote the book, he admitted, “I was addicted to pornography since I was 12 years old. My father was addicted to alcohol and my mother was addicted to religion. So what happens is you had an addictive household.” 
“It messed up my life in a lot of ways,” he said of pornography...
After entering rehab six years ago, Crews changed his ways and now firmly believes porn “changes the way you think about people. People become objects. People become body parts. People become things to be used rather than people to be loved.”
He meant to share his personal experiences as a “servant to my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ,” while touching on masculine pride and porn being “an intimacy killer.”

Despite his reveal being layered with his own moral views, Crews is helping to put the message out there that addiction doesn’t have to be such a secret in your fight to conquer it.