Addiction Sameness

Alcohol, Opiates, Fat and Sugar are all Addictive Substances: this blog is about that "addiction sameness".

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Dr. Dean Ornish: Healthy Eating During the Holidays

Statistic: Americans gain 1 to 1½ pounds annually during the holiday season
16 steps to healthy holiday eating: 

1. Eat something beforehand. If you don’t eat all day, you may arrive at holiday meals and parties ravenous and lose control.

2. Put 20 percent fewer high-calorie foods and 20 percent more fruits and vegetables on your plate. 
Studies show that you probably won’t notice the difference.

3. Eat the healthier foods first – they will fill you up somewhat, so you’ll be less likely to overeat the more indulgent foods.

4. Choose foods that leave evidence – e.g., keep the shrimp tails and chicken wing bones on your plate after you’ve eaten them. Studies show that if you have cues to see how much you’ve eaten, you’ll eat less.

5. Try not to put more than two or three items on your plate at one time. We eat more when food is in front of us.

6. Eat more slowly. The faster we eat, the more we eat. Sip water between bites. Holiday meals last longer than typical meals. If you wolf down your food, your plate may be clean while others are still eating, which will lead to seconds.

7. If you have a choice, use a smaller plate!

8. If you’re at someone’s home, try to serve yourself instead of allowing your relative to heap your plate full.

9. Arrive a little late and make a grand entrance. More of the indulgent foods will be gone by then.

10. If you go to a restaurant, ask your server not to put bread on the table beforehand. If it’s there, you’ll probably eat it. Leave more room for your favorite holiday foods instead.

11. Substitute cranberry sauce for gravy, which is usually high in fat and calories. Cranberry sauce is nutritious and loaded with antioxidants.

12. If you eat baked potatoes and yams, avoid toppings such as butter, cheese, bacon and sour cream. If possible, substitute low-fat yogurt or nonfat sour cream.

13. Watch the alcohol, which is high in calories and slows your metabolism. Also, too much alcohol can impair judgment, so the more you drink, the more you’re likely to eat.

14. Close your eyes and savor the food periodically during the meal. You’ll consume fewer calories and experience more pleasure.

15. Have just a few bites of dessert. The first and last bites are always the best, anyway.

16. Take a walk after dinner. You don’t have to hike five miles. A stroll around the block is a good start. Walking not only burns calories, it also helps relieve bloating and prevent heartburn.

For more information, and additional tips from Dr. Ornish on how to make healthy choices throughout the holiday season, visit www.marshealthyliving.com.


The Dr. Dean Ornish Heart Program reverses heart disease.

The program for Reversing Heart Disease focuses on alternatives besides surgery.

Folks met to learn about stress management, moderate aerobic exercise, nutrition and group support. The program has already enabled thousands to reduce their risk of heart complications.

It's a tough program you know, there's no beating around the bush. It's a hard program because you're asking people to make changes in their life, changes that, the way they've lived their life has lead them to the point where they now have heart disease or significant enough risk factors for heart disease.

http://www.wdtv.com/index.php/home/local-news/10592-program-is-offering-hope-to-heart-patients




The Dr. Dean Ornish Heart Program reverses heart disease.

The program for Reversing Heart Disease focuses on alternatives besides surgery.

Folks met to learn about stress management, moderate aerobic exercise, nutrition and group support. The program has already enabled thousands to reduce their risk of heart complications.

It's a tough program you know, there's no beating around the bush. It's a hard program because you're asking people to make changes in their life, changes that, the way they've lived their life has lead them to the point where they now have heart disease or significant enough risk factors for heart disease.

http://www.wdtv.com/index.php/home/local-news/10592-program-is-offering-hope-to-heart-patients

Blogger's Comments:
Get a head start on your New Year's Resolution to lose weight by not adding to the problem by over eating during the holiday season.


Remember the best exercise is pushing away from the table partially hungry.  Your stomach will soon tell you that you were, after all, full...



Sugar and Breakfast Cereals


Cereal offenders: How do we get the sugar out of breakfast? | Grist:

Photo: Chris Metcalf

Raise your hand if you serve your kids a bowl of Twinkies for breakfast. Or perhaps they prefer a few cookies instead? According to the Environmental Working Group's (EWG) new report on children's cereals, that's effectively what millions of kids are eating in the morning.

Indeed, the amount of sugar in many popular brands of cereals is astonishing: Kellogg's Honey Smacks is 56 percent sugar by weight. One cup of the stuff has more sugar than a Hostess Twinkie, says the report, while "a cup of any of 44 other children's cereals has more sugar than three Chips Ahoy! cookies."

EWG's 10 worst cereals, with Honey Smacks as No. 1, include:
Post Golden Crisp -- 51.9 percent sugar
Kellogg's Froot Loops Marshmallow -- 48.3 percent sugar
Quaker Oats Cap'n Crunch's OOPS! All Berries -- 46.9 percent sugar
Quaker Oats Cap'n Crunch Original -- 44.4 percent sugar
Quaker Oats Oh!s -- 44.4 percent sugar
Kellogg's Smorz -- 43.3 percent sugar
Kellogg's Apple Jacks -- 42.9 percent sugar
Quaker Oats Cap'n Crunch's Crunch Berries -- 42.3 percent sugar
Kellogg's Froot Loops Original -- 41.4 percent sugar

A while back, in a post called "In defense of candy," I observed that the problem with our food system isn't the obvious treats like candy; after all, "the typical American gets only 6 percent of their added sugar from candy." The real problem is the "candification" of our food system. And this report from EWG provides even more evidence. While many Grist readers probably don't serve their children sweetened breakfast cereal, millions of Americans do, and they are blitzed by billions of dollars in advertising telling them to do it. Somehow, reading a nutrition label and seeing that Honey Smacks has 20 grams (that's nearly five teaspoons) of sugar per serving does not have the same impact as slapping a label on the box that reads, "Warning: Equivalent to Eating a Twinkie."

EWG also notes that many children's cereals are high in sodium as well; sugar and salt are two of the Big Three ingredients (fat is the other) that food companies pour into their recipes to keep consumers eating after they're full.

So the question is: What to do about this? How can we stop...


Blogger suggestion 
-Vote with your wallet by avoiding high sugar added products as declared on the labels.


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